medical marijuana

Cannabinoids: the other side of the coin, side effects, drug-drug interaction and possible problems of cannabidiol and tetrahydrocannabinol

Virginia Thornley, M.D., Board-Certified Neurologist, Epileptologist

@VThornleyMD

April 6, 2018

 

Introduction

Medical marijuana seems like the shining breakthrough drug the shining pill in armor, the magic pill that seems to cure everything. However, there are always two sides to every coin. One must still proceed with caution. The phytocannabinoids, cannabidiol, and tetrahydrocannabinol exert their effects through the endocannabinoid pathway, the CB1 receptor is most abundantly found in the nervous system. Cannabidiol which has no euphoria acts weakly with the CB1 receptor almost as a reverse agonist blocking the THC from exerting its effect offsetting potent side effects of tetrahydrocannabinol.

The medical benefits are overwhelmingly numerous including ameliorating seizures, spasms from multiple sclerosis, peripheral neuropathy in HIV patients, chronic debilitating pain, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and other associated diseases. Despite the stigma of using it, the delay in clinical trials and marked hesitation of the medical community, medical marijuana has landed and there is no going back. Yet even with its numerous health benefits, it is always prudent to take a step back and examine any flaws as with any other new kid on the block or any new agent that comes along even though it’s been around for thousands of years.

Is marijuana safe for medical use? The take on medical marijuana by the FDA

So far from the FDA official website, the FDA does not recognize medical marijuana coming from the botanical plant with any medical indication. The FDA does not recognize it to be safe or beneficial for any type of disease or condition. The FDA will facilitate any companies interested in bringing quality products including science-based research. The full take of the FDA on marijuana can be found here https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/PublicHealthFocus/ucm421168.htm#use

Long-term effects on the brain

Perusing the scientific literature, it is difficult to find any long-term damage to the brain. There was a report in a heavy marijuana user where there was damage to the corpus callosum, possibly worse with young users (1). This is a small study of 11 heavy marijuana users with 11 age-matched cohorts. Diffusion tensor imaging was used. Previous reports alluded towards poor cognition with heavy marijuana use. This study is aligned with that. It was suggested that there may be increased diffusibility within the white matter tracts of the corpus callosum. Young age is thought to make the corpus more susceptible to white matter damage. The only caveat is this is with heavy use and the substance found in recreational marijuana is going to be a different form compared to medical marijuana extracted from the marijuana plant used for medicinal purposes. It is not clear if this report would carry over to medical marijuana users where the preparation of the product is much different(1).

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Effect on schizophrenia spectrum diseases

In a large study of 171 patients, it was found that with heavy use of cannabis, the age of onset of schizophrenia spectrum disorders seems to occur earlier (6). This is one of the reasons why in some dispensaries, it is not sold to patients with a history of schizophrenia. There are some anecdotal reports of some patients having a paranoia with medical marijuana that is reversible once taken off.

Effect on the heart, reports of myocardial infarcts and ST elevations

While the literature suggests low toxicity and most side effects are related to cognition and gastrointestinal problems, there are several cannabis-associated myocardial infarcts in the literature. The dispensaries in the state of Florida use a previous history of a previous myocardial infarct as a contraindication in using medical marijuana. These were synthetic drugs used recreationally. There was one case report where a heavy user suffered from an ST elevation and subsequent myocardial infarct after becoming toxic to marijuana used recreationally.  In one study, synthetic cannabis was used, the myocardial happened to a young patient where an atheromatous plaque was excluded as the source. Etiology and mechanism are unclear why infarcts should occur. It is quite possible that because it works on the 5HT receptor for anxiety which can cause vasoconstriction, this may be one mechanism. Other studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of action.

Drug-drug interactions

Because medical marijuana is used as an adjunctive agent for epilepsy, perhaps off-label since it has not been approved through FDA as an anti-epileptic agent yet, it was found that medical marijuana used in conjunction with Clobazam (Onfi) tended to elevate Onfi at higher levels.

In one small clinical study, in 13 patients, 9 had an increase of about 60 in the Clobazam level and by 300 in Norclobazam level. There was, however, a tremendous reduction of seizures by >50% but Onfi (Clobazam and Norclobazam levels) should be monitored (3) on a routine basis to avoid any untoward toxicity.

Other milder symptoms

In one large study on Lennox-Gastaut syndrome where cannabidiol was titrated to a 20mg/kg over a course of 14 weeks, mild to moderate symptoms were noted including pyrexia, sedation, dizziness, and diarrhea. However, the titration rate was very rapid and the patents who were 50kg were quickly at 1000mg within 14 weeks which does not usually happen in the real world. Medications are usually increased over a longer period of time in slower increments.

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In summary

While everybody is touting the horn of medical marijuana it is always prudent to stand back and ensure there are no possible risk factors for adverse side effects. The most serious and common seen in the literature appear to be related to schizophrenia spectrum disorders and cannabis associated myocardial infarct. The only caveat is that the literature is peppered with these reports, however, the quality of the recreational drugs are vastly different from medical marijuana which tends to be organic and all natural extracted from the plant in licensed medical dispensaries. The extraction of the medical components is vastly different from the smoked synthetic version of tetrahydrocannabinol. So, is difficult to know if these reports would actually corroborate with use in medical marijuana. The ones with side effects were heavy users of recreational smoked types of marijuana, it is unclear if it was synthetic or organic. As the popularity of medical marijuana progresses, more information will be available regarding the side effect profile.

References

  1. Arnone, et al, “Corpus callosum damage in heavy use: preliminary evidence from diffusion tensor tractography and tract-based spatial statistics,” Neuroimage, 2008, Jul., 1, 41 (3): 1067-74.  “J Addict Med. 2017 Sep/Oct;11(5):405-407. doi: 10.1097/ADM.0000000000000326.
  2. Volpon, et al, “Multiple cerebral infarcts in a young patient associated with marijuana use, ” Journ. Addic. Med, 2017, Sep./Oct., 11(5):405-407.
  3. Geffrey, Drug-drug interaction between clobazam and cannabidiol in children with refractory epilepsy,” Epilepsia, 2015, Aug., 58 (8):1246-1251.
  4. Stewart, et al, “Obstructive sleep apnea due to laryngospasm links ictal to postictal events in SUDEP cases and offers practical biomarkers for review of past cases and prevention of new ones,” Epilepsia, 2017, Jun., 58(6): e87-90
  5. https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/PublicHealthFocus/ucm421168.htm#use
  6. Shahzade, et al, “Patterns in adolescent cannabis use predict the onset and symptom structure of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder,” Schizophrenia Research, 2018, Feb., 2 pii S090-9964 doi:10. 1016/j. schres. 2018.01.008 (Epub ahead of print)
  7. Orsini, et al, “Prolonged cardiac arrest complicating massive ST-segment elevation myocardial infarct associated with myocardial consumption,” J. Community Hosp. Intern. Med. Perspect, 2016, Sep., 7. 6 (4):31695
  8. Thiele, et al, “Cannabidiol in patients with seizures from Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (GWPCARE4): a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled phase 3 trial,” Lancet, 2018, Jan., 390 (10125):1085-1096

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Uncategorized

Cannabidiol: a large study in the U.S., Netherlands, and Poland shows its efficacy in patients with the epileptic disorder Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

Virginia Thornley, M.D., Neurologist, Epileptologist

@VThornleyMD

March 31, 2018

Introduction

Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome is an epileptic syndrome starting in childhood characterized by a wide spectrum of seizures and slow spike and wave on EEG. The seizures are characterized by the classic mnemonic “a fall, a jerk and a stare” or atonic seizures, myoclonus and complex partial seizures, although there are many other different types. Slow spike and wave generalized epileptiform discharges of 2.5 Hertz or less on electroencephalogram clinch the diagnosis. Patients are often delayed in development. Controlling seizures, because of the sheer complexity, of the different types is often a medical challenge.

Methods of the study

A new study using cannabidiol, which is the non-psychoactive medical component of the cannabis sativa plant, was carried out with the results recently demonstrating value. It covered 24 sites from the U.S., the Netherlands and Poland and studied seizures in patients medically refractory to medications using cannabidiol as an adjunctive add-on agent.  171 patients were enrolled from April 28, 2015, to October 15, 2015, and were randomly assigned to either the placebo control or the group with cannabidiol. 86 received cannabidiol and 85 were in the placebo group. 14 discontinued treatment in the cannabidiol group and 1 in the placebo group. All patients had at least one dose of treatment. Eligible patients ranged from 2-55 years old. Cannabidiol was given at a dose of 20mg/kg.

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Seizure reduction

The results were startling, there was a reduction of seizures by 43.9% in the cannabidiol group and 21% in the control group. 86% patients had side effects in the cannabidiol group and 69% in the control group on placebo. These included somnolence, pyrexia, diarrhea, reduced appetite, and vomiting. 12 stopped in the cannabidiol group due to adverse reactions considered mild to moderate while 1 withdrew from the placebo group. 1 died due to unrelated causes from the cannabidiol group.

Conclusion

Reviewing this study, perhaps one of my critiques of this study is that the dosage was 20mg/kg in a 14-week study which means that within 14 weeks a patient of 50 kg. would have been ramped up to about 1000mg. In real life practice, medications are titrated more gradually over a period of months before maximum efficacy may be seen and in such a gradual way in order to avoid side effects. Although a large percentage of patients had side effects which were mild to moderate, it is quite possible they may have needed a smaller dose and the dosages were increased more than it was necessary to achieve the beneficial effects seen in the study within a short period of time. Nevertheless, the bottom line is that cannabidiol, a product of the Cannabis sativa plant, shows a reduction in seizures in a patient with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

This study concluded that there is some efficacy of cannabidiol in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, one of the most difficult epileptic syndromes to treat, and was found with only very mild to moderate side effects. An open-label study as an extension to this study is currently ongoing.

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Reference

  1. Thiele, et al,. “Cannabidiol in patients with seizures from Lennox Gastaut Syndrome (GWPCARE4): a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled phase 3 trial,” Lancet, 2018, Jan., 390 (10125):1085-1096.
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ketogenic diet, Uncategorized

Ketogenic diet, modified Atkins diet and what is in them: used in seizure control, can these be a weight loss solution to morbid obesity, a risk factor for cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease?

Virginia Thornley, M.D., Neurologist, Epileptologist

@VThornleyMD

March 29, 2018

Introduction

Ketogenic diet has been used for seizure control when physicians started to notice a reduction of seizures in patients with a high ketone laden diet. This fell out of favor in the 1920’s with the onset of newer agents. As a side note, weight loss has been noted in those on a ketogenic diet.

Previously, guidelines have recommended a reduction in saturated fat which was thought to be the cause of the growing morbid obesity epidemic. Currently, it has been found that carbohydrates which are rich and refined may contribute towards the obesity epidemic. Sugar-laden sodas, the white bread which has refined flour, pizza batter made out of refined flour, all these food which are popular in theIt is no Western culture contribute to the morbid obesity as it is looming today.

How current culture sets the perfect stage for morbid obesity

The current western diet is about 50% carbohydrates. In addition, physical activity is at an all-time low compared to other eras. The current culture is designed as a sedentary and carbohydrate-rich eating culture. Everything nowadays is rapid pace. There are drive-through banks, drive-through pharmacies. Rather than having to physically go to a shop or order things in person,  many things can be done online or by phone reducing the daily need to exert physical activity. There is less time spent on physical activity compared to 100 years ago. If you go to neighborhoods, sidewalks no longer exist. Unless one lives in an urban environment where you are forced to walk to the bus station or live in cities amenable to walking or biking, the car is the mode of transport. Food is rich in carbohydrate, such hamburger buns, pizza dough, white bread or rolls. It is little wonder that morbid obesity abounds.  Food rich in sugar is abundant in grocery store aisles including donuts, cookies, baking packets. The colorful rich in anti-oxidant fresh fruits and vegetables are usually on the sides of the grocery shops, the food that is actually good for you and you need to take time out of your schedule to cook.

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Living a healthy diet is not just staying active but also eating the proper diet. Food that is closest to their original source are richest in nutrients. In short, the colorful vegetables you have to cook without any of the processing that takes place are the food richest in nutrients and have high anti-oxidant properties. Anti-oxidation is important in helping to combat a wide variety of diseases. Colorful fruits and vegetables are rich in fiber and more difficult to digest, hence, uses up more calories. Those which are high in refined carbohydrates are easily digested and contributes more towards obesity.

Components of the ketogenic diet and ketogenic diet variants

Ketogenic diet variants include modified Atkins diet, low glycemic index treatment, and medium chain diet. The ketogenic diet consists of 4:1 ratio of fat to carbohydrates shifting metabolism to the use of ketone bodies as a source of energy. A lower ratio is sometimes employed called the modified ketogenic diet with a 3:1 or 2:1 ratio of fat to carbohydrates. In the modified ketogenic diet, the palatability is improved and avoids the gastrointestinal symptoms associated with the ketogenic diet such as nausea. With the modified Atkins diet, carbohydrates are restricted to 10-20 grams a day, or a 1-2:1 ratio of protein to fat plus carbohydrates. In the low glycemic index treatment, carbohydrates are limited to 40-60 grams while 50-60% of the diet is fat and 20-30% is from protein. The medium-chain triglyceride diet employs oils as a supplement such as coconut oil. The palatability of these diets improve patient compliance and lessen the side effects of the ketogenic diet. Some patients also used the diets to incidentally lose weight in addition to treating seizures.

Ketogenic diet and evidence it works in losing weight

The ketogenic diet has a carbohydrate component of about 20-50 grams a day. It is not so much the restriction of the carbohydrates but the quality of carbohydrates that are ingested that causes people to shed pounds. High fiber, wheat, and whole grain carbohydrates portend a healthier diet as opposed to just restricting carbohydrates in general. In some clinical studies, it was found that weight loss was higher in those with a low carbohydrate diet compared to a low-fat diet (1).

Will the high fat cause me to have heart disease?

In one study where ketogenic diet was used in glucose transporter deficiency, a pediatric epileptic syndrome with encephalopathy, 10 patients were followed for 10 years. After 10 years on ketogenic therapies, there was no evidence of increased cardiovascular risk. While it is a small study, it shows evidence that eating a low carbohydrate diet did not appear to contribute towards heart disease. Larger clinical trials are needed (3).

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How obesity relates to other diseases

It is not uncommon to see patients who come into the ER or the doctor’s office with a history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus type II, hypercholesterolemia and obesity all related to one common denominator-obesity. Take away the obesity, the bad cholesterol or the LDL values go down, glucose goes down and hypertension resolves. When these risk factors are reduced early enough in your life, the odds of cerebrovascular disease or strokes and cardiovascular diseases or heart attacks vastly diminish. If, however, obesity is long-standing, while it is definitely good to reduce risk factors, once atherosclerosis is present in the blood vessels, there is no magic pill to reverse that.

Early identification and reduction of obesity as a contributor towards many health problems is key. Ketogenic diet may play a role in weight reduction. A small case series did not show any risk of heart disease while on the ketogenic diet long-term, over a span of 10 years. Larger clinical trials are needed to support this.

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Reference

  1. Giugliano, et al, “More sugar? No thank you! The elusive nature of low carbohydrate diets,” Endocrine, 2018, Mar, 19. doi: 10.1007/s12020-018-1580-X (Epub ahead of print)
  2. McDonald, et al, “Ketogenic diets for adults with highly refractory epilepsy,” Epilepsy Currents, 2017, Nov.-Dec., 17 (6):346-350.
  3. Heussinger, et al, “10 patients, 10 years-Long-term follow-up of cardiovascular risk factors in Glut1 deficiency treared with ketogenic diet therapies: a prospective , multicenter case series,” Clin. Nut., 2017, Nov, pil:S0261-5614 (17)31399-7.

 

 

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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Epilepsy, Glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, pain, Parkinson's disaese, Peripheral neuropathy, Tumor

Medical marijuana: dispelling myths and fallacies behind cannabidiol and tetrahydrocannabinol

Virginia Thornley, M.D. Neurologist, Epileptologist

Introduction

The endocannabinoid system is found naturally in the brain. It is responsible for the sense of well-being one gets after running a 5-mile course. It does not work through endorphins or adrenaline, as some people may think. It works at the level of the endocannabinoid system. There is a community of CBD producers and consumers and it is in this mysterious world that it is well-known to be used in many medical conditions, still shunned by the majority of the medical community, Congress and even patients in general. The 2 most commonly known are cannabidiol and tetrahydrocannabinol. Cannabidiol has medical properties and has a weak affinity to the CB1 receptor which is predominantly found throughout the central nervous system, which is likely why it is found to work in numerous neurological conditions. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is a well-known cannabinoid most notoriously known for the euphoria of kingpins seen on movies propagated by pop culture. Unfortunately, these connotations overshadow the well-known medicinal benefits. Cannabinoids have been used for centuries even in the B.C. period. It was part of the American pharmacopeia in the 1980’s until it was banned in the 1930’s. Slowly, these products are gaining popularity as a treatment for many medical conditions, primarily neurological because the CB1 receptor is so abundant in the nervous system, due to patients becoming more and more frustrated with the adverse effects and ineffectiveness of conventional treatments. In Europe, a combination of THC and CBD have been used in multiple sclerosis patients since 2010.  Animal studies and cell line culture studies demonstrate many potential mechanisms in which CB1 receptors, CBD and THC may be beneficial at the cellular level in many diseases, mechanisms are still being elucidated. It is most commonly used for chronic pain and epilepsy. As with any medication, it may or not be effective for everybody.

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How it works–the nitty gritty

Cannabidiol has none of the psychoactive properties as THC. One needs 100 times the amount of CBD to have the same intoxication as THC. Therefore, it works well for those who are reluctant to go this route but who have found conventional medications which do not provide effectiveness, they are simply not cutting it. Because very little is know about its titration, medical marijuana can seem like entering into the world of an apothecary, or such as that found in the medieval days when potions are concocted. Physicians who use it in their treat it similar to a medication and the guidelines are similar start low and go slowly.  Tetrahydrocannabinol is more potent and at higher doses works more effectively for pain control and seizures. THC is used at relatively low concentrations in order to effect its medical properties, at higher concentrations one may run into side effects which offsets its medical value. There are different ratios of CBD:THC, different ratios correspond to different symptoms treated.  CBD is required in conjunction with THC in order to offset the potential side effects of THC. Tolerance does not build in the system such as that seen with opioids, although if one is medical marijuana naive, the lowest dose possible is ideal. There are no side effects of respiratory depression such as that seen with other medications for pain such as opioids.Consult with your treating physician.

Current legal state of affairs

Currently, there are many states that recognize the medical value of medical marijuana with medical marijuana laws allowing the opening of licensed dispensaries. However, the same cannot be said for the federal law.  In some states, the carrying of THC on your person can result in fines and imprisonment. Despite marijuana laws enacted, qualified physicians are at risk for being questioned by authorities, its recommendation and use is not for the faint of heart on the part of physicians and patients. Cannabidiol comes from hemp oil and is not considered illegal. However, anyone who even has 1% hemp oil in their product can still label that product as cannabidiol, which may be the reason why some patients are not getting the full medical effects when bought from the flea market or a vitamin store.  Tetrahydrocannabidiol which is more well-known for its recreational use and concomitant psychoactive properties at very high doses is federally illegal in many states. Many states often have registries so patients who require this may obtain an ID and verify they are under the care of a qualified physician. It can take a few months to obtain an ID because many patients are often at the end of their ropes in terms of effectiveness of medications. Many patients wish to come off opioids or do not like the idea of needing higher and higher pain medications for their chronic illnesses. It may serve as a great antidote for the current opioid crisis that is well-documented in the news or overdocumented in the news. Many mothers order products online from other countries to counteract the illegalities of their states in order to help their child who may be using 4 potent anti-epileptic agents and is now like a zombie because of the number of medications. While physicians are leery suggesting anything that is in category 1, its medical value cannot be disputed. There is too much evidence tipping it towards the other side of the scale. As tPA was in its infancy of use and physicians were hesitant using it due to its hemorrhagic adverse effect and is now the standard of care for stroke protocols, medical marijuana will likely find its way back into the pharmacopeia, the amount of medical evidence is far too compelling to ignore.

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In conclusion

In short, when used wisely, cannabidiol is a non-intoxicating effective treatment for many medical conditions especially neurologic, as evidenced by thousands of years of history of its use and current animal models, clinical trials and wider clinical experience in Europe. When cannabidiol is combined with low concentrations of THC, the medical effect is even greater with the entourage effect without the stigmatized psychoactive effects that are usually associated with THC.

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Epilepsy, Glaucoma, pain, Peripheral neuropathy, Tumor

Medical Marijuana: why the huge disconnect between physicians, laws, policies, and patients?

Virginia Thornley, M.D., Neurologist, Epileptologist

March 11, 2018

Introduction

A patient comes to you asking “Doc, my seizures are getting worse, I really hate the side effects of my medications, I really want to go a different route. Have you heard about medical marijuana?” You start sweating profusely, fidgeting in your seat, thinking of every single reason why not to recommend it and come up with  the standard response, “uh, well, I’m not qualified to recommend it and it’s not FDA approved, plus we don’t really know much about it there could be so many side effects.” And then we have the oldie but goodie response, “there’s not enough large randomized control trials to recommend it.” This scene plays 100,000 times over if not a million times over in physician offices across the country. Patients who are disillusioned with adverse effects of medications are looking towards alternative therapy. As surprising as it sounds, patients with chronic pain do not want to get intoxicated by opioids. In fact, some want to be tapered off of them or refuse them all together. Patients with end-stage cancer at the terminal stage of their lives wish to live a comfortable and humane existence without the need for more chemotherapeutic medications or pain medications that consistently make them feel like a zombie. While other patients with epilepsy may be on 4 different anti-epileptic agents and can no longer function or have a good quality of life because of side effects. There are two sides to every coin.

Why you should be educated on cannabidiol and THC use in medical conditions

If patients do not get their answers from their trusted physicians who they trust with their well-being, their health, the temples of their souls, they will go to great lengths in procuring this knowledge. This is via various sites on the internet some of the dubious nature others are from high quality companies that have been in business even before this seeming treatment fad started. Or, the information may be obtained from their brother-in-law’s friend’s hair stylist who is now pain-free after going through a long course of pain medications including ablative treatments, physical therapy, and acupuncture and has a physician who does recommend it. Like it or not, cannabidiol and tetrahydrocannabinol are alternative treatment options and are gaining more and more traction. To ignore it is to be complacent with the changing direction and landscape of medicine. As patients become more and more disillusioned by the limitation of conventional treatments, attention is directed towards alternative regimens. It is not just for the yoga-practicing patient looking for more natural methods, one sees the sweet 83-year-old gentleman who must be someone’s grandfather with the chronic hip pain of 50 years who have failed opioids and is simply looking for pain relief.

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Is there any evidence that it works?

The endocannabinoid pathway is found naturally in the system. It is responsible for the runner’s sense of wellbeing one gets after a 5-mile run and the pleasant mood you get after a 1-hour work-out with Zumba. There are 2 receptors in the system CB1 receptor which has the highest number of brain cells and the CB2 receptor which is found predominantly in the immune system. There are 2 common cannabinoids cannabidiol and tetrahydrocannabinol which exert various medical effects. Cannabidiol (CBD) has a weak affinity for the CB1 receptor and one needs 100 times the amount to get the same euphoria that one gets from tetrahydrocannabinol, the bane of every ER physician. Unfortunately, the side effects of euphoria of THC have preceded its popularity as a medical product. Little do we know it was once used for hundreds of years as a medication before the psychoactive properties were exploited for recreational purposes. In urologic culture cell lines, it is found that cannabinoids may reduce proliferation of cancer cells and reduce the pro-inflammatory microenvironment that is necessary for metastatic conditions (1). Human studies are still needed to determine a reduction in tumor loads. THC receptors are found in retinal cells and may be found to reduce intraocular pressure in glaucoma (5, 6). Cannabidiol is found to bind to the 5HT1 receptor which reduces anxiety. THC has been well-established in the mouse model to promote the inhibitory control of excitatory pathways in the hippocampus, where seizures commonly arise (8). There is an increase in CB1 receptors after prolonged seizures suggesting a compensatory response.  It has been used in combination and found in several randomized control trials to reduce the frequency of seizures by as much as 36% in medically refractory patients (2). It is well-established that cannabinoids reduce pain refractory to conventional medications (3). It has been found in bench research to be an antioxidant and have anti-inflammatory properties (4, 7). Some studies cite side effects of somnolence, nausea, dysphoria, however, it is not clear what was the quality of cannabinoids or dosages were used. At high doses, while THC can reduce pain it may also result in side effects, which is why it is usually used in combination with CBD which ameliorates the side effects of THC.  In addition, cannabidiol by itself has no euphoria and it takes 100 times the amount to achieve intoxication seen with THC use. Synthetic products will have more side effects than products that are organic meaning only of natural materials.

Given the huge amount of evidence in several different medical conditions (3), the results should overwhelmingly be towards a push in using cannabinoids more frequently. However, because of the cynicism of the public, physicians even of patients, who have been exposed more frequently to the harmful psychoactive side effects, the benefits are far overshadowed. More clinical randomized controlled trials are needed. Most literature cites small numbers of patients enrolled in studies or review multiple medical centers where the conditions are not uniform. In addition, some of the patients that would benefit the most are the least in numbers such as those with rare neurological conditions such as Dravet syndrome or Lennox-Gastuat syndrome.

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In conclusion

As it still stands, many states still do not recognize the medicinal value of cannabidiol or tetrahydrocannabinol. In some states, medical physicians are not allowed to recommend it and put themselves at risk for FBI questioning in even suggesting its use. It is not uncommon for patients to move states or order from other states or countries to procure this liquid gold that is supposed to work wonders. Only time will tell if this is a passing fad and if there are long-standing side effects, however, as of current standing, medical marijuana is here to stay. As far as the literature goes, there are beneficial results but it is a cautionary tale as more studies in large human trials are still needed. As with any new preclinical data, the preclinical status may get ahead of itself and human trials do not replicate the desired results. But from the small clinical trials in seizures, pain, nausea, anxiety, and loss of appetite, the results are promising while more research is needed for anti-tumor effects in humans.

As with any medication, there will be clear-cut side effects just as with any other medication which is why more studies are needed to determine the least amount with the least amount of side effects. In some studies,  amounts upwards of 50mg/kg (2) is used the high amounts likely responsible for causing side effects, which is far higher than that cautioned by medical marijuana dispensaries. It will take patients time to wrap their heads around taking guidance from a fresh-faced 20-year-old millennial at the spa-like dispensary which is currently the norm at most dispensaries, who likely knows much more than even most medical professionals. It seems it will take even longer in Congress to understand the potential benefit of cannabinoids from a medical standpoint especially with the present opioid epidemic. Countries in Europe have far surpassed the United States when it comes to cutting-edge treatments. Perhaps, it will take even longer for the medical community to see the medical potential with their exposure to the sinister side of tetrahydrocannabinol seen in patients in the ER for non-medical reasons, which may be one of the most challenging stumbling blocks.

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Introduction/Disclaimer

References:

  1. Ghandhi, et al, “Systemic review of the potential role of cannabinoids as anti-proliferative agents for urological cancer,” Can. Urol. Assoc. J., 2017, May,-April., 11(3-4):E138-E142.
  2. Devinsky, et al, “Cannabidiol in patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy: an open-label interventional trial,” Lancet Neurology, 2016, Mar., 15(3):270-280.
  3. Petzke, et al, “Efficacy, tolerability, and safety of cannabinoids for chronic neuropathic pain: a systemic review of randomized controlled studies,” Schmerz, 2016, Feb., 30(1):62-88.
  4. Rajan. et al, “Gingival stromal cells as an in vitro model: cannabidiol modulates genes linked with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis,” Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 2017, Apr., 118(4):819-828.
  5. ElSohly, et al, “Cannabinoids in glaucoma II: the effect of different cannabinoids on intraocular pressure on rabbits,”Current Eye Research, 1984, Jun., 3(6):841-50.
  6. Jarvinen, T., “Cannabinoids in the treatment of glaucoma,” Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2002, Aug., 95(2):203-20.
  7. Carroll, et al, “9-Tetrahydrocannabinol exerts a direct neuroprotective effect in human cell culture model of Parkinson’s disease,” Neuropathology and Applied Neuropharmacology, 2012, Oct., 38(6):3535-547.
  8. Kaplan, et al, “Cannabidiol attenuates seizures and social deficits in a mouse model in Dravet syndrome,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, 2017, Oct.
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