PRP

Platelet-rich plasma and mechanism of action

Virginia Thornley, M.D., Neurologist
January 26, 2020

Introduction
Pain is one of the most common conditions that brings a patient to see a physician. Pain is a sign of dysfunction, something is not quite right. There is a plethora of research devoted to understanding the mechanisms.

Some of the more novel approaches are platelet-rich plasma and stem cell therapy. Currently, it is not FDA approved in the United States. It is a novel approach used more extensively outside of the United States.

Mechanism of action
PRP has several growth factors that helps with pain one of which is platelet derived growth factor (PDGF). PDGF arises in the setting of injury when platelets are degranulated. It activates cells which develop high phosphate bonds which leads to specific activities. These activities include mitogenesis, angiogensis and stimulation of macrophage activity. Other growth factors include TGF-beta or transforming growth factor-beta. The target cells are pre-osteoblasts, fibroblasts and marrow stem cells. VEGF or vascular endothelial growth factor is found which stimulates angiogenesis or the formation of new blood vessels. EGF or epidermal growth factor stimulates growth of cells, proliferation and differentiation (1).

Indications
It was found to be helpful in helping injured ligaments and tendons in sports injury.
In one study of 22 patients with intradiscal pain, PRP intradiscal injections were performed which showed encouraging results (2). There are many other indications for PRP in terms of pain control for other conditions.

Summary
PRP shows promising results for various types of pain which was initially used in sports medicine injury but is now expanding to other areas. Large randomized-controlled clinical trials are still needed. However, it is still a viable option. More studies are needed.


References
Jain., N.K., Gulati, M, Platelet-rich plasma: a healing virtuoso, Blood Res. 2016 Mar; 51(1):3-5.
Levi, D., Horn, S., Tyszko, S., Levin, J., Hecht-Leavitt, C., Walko, E., Intradiscal platelet-rich plasma injection for chronic discogenic low back pain: preliminary results from a prospective trial, Pain Med. 2016, Jun; 17(6):1010-1022.

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neurology

Can anti-psychotic agents reduce brain volume?

Virginia Thornley, M.D.
Neurologist, Epileptologist
October 9, 2019
Can medications cause cerebral atrophy? Atrophy refers to shrinkage of the cells causing the appearance of the brain to have less volume than usual.
This question was asked last week. Anti-epileptics such as phenytoin is well-known in the literature and clinically to cause cerebellar atrophy. But what about other agents such as anti-psychotics.
Animal studies
In one animal study, exposure to anti-psychotic drugs showed a reduced volume of brain on volumetric studies. The number of cells remained the same but the volume was increased for cells in the anterior cingulate gyrus which is in the  limbic lobe. The limbic lobe subserves emotions and has influence on memory. Animal studies do not always correlate with human responses.
Human studies
One small study showed that the thalamic volume was reduced after olanzepine administration. This was a small study of 10 patients (2).
While there is some information in the literature the studies are animal studies and small human studies. More information is needed. Based on the current literature, there are not enough significant studies to correlate atrophy with use of anti-psychotics.
References
  1. Vernon, A.C., Crum, W.R., Lerch, J.P., Chege, W., Natesan, S., Modo, M., Cooper, J.D., Williams, S.C., Kapur, S. Reduced cortical volume and elevated astrocyte density in rats chronically treated with anti-psychotic drugs-linking magentic resonance imaging findings to cellular pathology. Biol Psychiatry. 2014, Jun. 15, 75(12):982-90
  2. Khorram, B., Lang, D.J., Kopala, L.C., Vandorpe, RF.A., Rui, Q., Goghari, V.M., Smith, G.N., Honer, W.G. Reduced thalamic volume in patients with chronic schizophrenia after switching from typical anti-psychotic medications to olanzepine. Am J sychiatry. 2006, Nov. 163 (11):2005-7
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dementia

Animal study demonstrating CBD’s (cannabidiol) effects on neuroplasticity and memory loss

Virginia Thornley, M.D.
Neurologist, Epileptologist
August 26, 2019
In an animal study, one group demonstrates that Cannabidiol may help with the neuroplasticity in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (1).
LTP in the hippocampus is the long-term potentiation seen that elevates the efficacy of synapses involved in memory. Beta-amyloid peptide is toxic towards this  feature. When animals were pretreated with CBD the neurotoxicity was found to be reduced against beta-amyloid peptide. The same study showed that it did not involve the 5-HT1a, CB1 or adenosine receptors (1).
There have been other previous studies showing that cannabidiol could have protective effects against the toxic effects of beta-amyloid peptide which is involved in the neurodegenerative process seen in Alzheimer’s disease.
More clinical randomized control trials are needed. Animal studies do not always translate into human studies.
Neurologybuzz.com
References
  1. Hughes, B., Herron, C.E., Cannabidiol reverses deficits in hippocampal LTP in a model of Alzheimer’s disease. Neurochem. Res. 2019, Mar. 44(3):703-713

This is medical information not medical advice. Please consult with your physician.

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multiple sclerosis, Uncategorized

The impact of immunomodulating agents used in multiple sclerosis on the risk of cancer

Virginia Thornley, M.D., Neurologist, Epileptologist
June 14, 2019
Introduction
Multiple sclerosis is already an illness where the immune system recognizes the nervous system specifically the white matter tracts as foreign and attacks it. The complex cascade of mechanisms make adequate treatment challenging. Many treatments focus on the inflammatory mechanism with little attention on the degenerative mechanism involved.
Presentation of symptoms come in a wide variety depending on the the location of the multiple sclerosis plaque in the brain.
Patients may have concomitant morbidities which may make treatment challenging.
 
Immunomodulating agents and its impact on cancer
Many of the newer treatments for multiple sclerosis work at the level of the immune system through immunosuppression, the newer ones tend to be very potent. With greater efficacy comes greater risks including the risk of cancer.
Some of the newer medications can potentially increase the risk of cancer. Higher risk of cancer was found in many reports to occur with use of cyclophosphamide, azathioprine and mitoxanthrone. Fingolimod, natalizumab and alemtuzamab  can potentially increase the risk of cancer, these agents lack long-term data and work through the immune system. Dimethyl fumarate, terifluonimide, ocrelizumab, daclizumab and cladribine merit mandatory risk management plans to detect cancer before its use.
Reference
  1. Lebrun, C., Rocher, F., Cancer risk in patients with multiple sclerosis: potential impact of disease-modifying drugs. CNS Drugs. 2018, Oct. 32(10):939-949 doi:10.1007/s40263-018-0564-y
Disclaimer: This is medical information only not medical advice. Please consult your physician
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cerebellar ataxia

Genetics of Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxia and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

Virginia Thornley, M.D.
Neurologist, Epileptologist
March 18, 2019
Introduction
Cerebellar ataxias are rare disorders, only a few types are treatable. This reviews some of the research regarding the genetics of cerebellar ataxias.
Next generation sequencing is a revolutionary way of DNA sequencing that can sequence an entire genome in one day which previously took 10 years. Clinical applications are still pending (1).
Genetics of hereditary cerebellar ataxias
In one study of 87 patients, the genetics were studies. In the probands meaning the first in a genetic line, triplet repeat testing was done. 58% were male. Genetic variants included ANO10, CACNA1A, SPG7 and DRKCG. The detection rate in probands for the trinucleotide repeat was about 13.8%. Those with variants may have a longer duration of disease and a slower progression of the disorder (2).
 
Genetic testing in hereditary spastic paraparesis
In another study where 306 were genetically tested, next generation sequence testing was performed and different genes were found. These include ATL1 (atlastin 1, SPG3),
PAST (spastin, SPG4),  ITPR1, WASHC5 (SPG8),  KIF1A (SPG30), SPG11 spastacsin), KIF5A (SPG10), CYP27A1, and SETX (3).
There are overlapping genetics and clinical symptoms with spinocerebellar ataxia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Reference
  1. Behjati, S., Tarpey, P., What is next generation sequencing? Arch Dis Child Educ Pract Ed. 2013 Dec; 98(6)236-238
  2. Kang, C., Liang, C., Ahmad, K.E., Gu, Y., Siow, S.F., Colebatch, J.G., Whyte, S., N, K., Cremer, P.D., Corbett, A.J., Davis, R.L., Roscioloi, T., Cowley, M.J., Park, S.J., Sue, C.M., Kumar, K.R. High Degree of Genetic Hetereogeneity for Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias in Australia, Cerebellum, 2019, Feb. (1):137-146
  3. Elert-Dobkowska, E., Stepniak, I., Krysa, W., Ziora-Jakutowicz, K., Rakowicz, M., Sobanska, A., Pilch, J., Antczak-Marach, D., Zaremba, J., Sulek, A. Next-generation sequencing reveals the broader variant spectrum of hereditary spastic paraplegia and related phenotypes. Neurogenetic, 2019, Feb, doi:10.1007/s10048-019-00565-6
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multiple sclerosis

Ketogenic diet: can it play a role in treating symptoms of Multiple sclerosis?

Virginia Thornley, M.D., Neurologist, Epileptologist
September 19, 2018
@VThornleyMD
Introduction
Multiple sclerosis has no cure at this current moment. It is unclear what is the exact etiology otherwise there would be a cure. Based on research, genetic and environmental factors play a role. Based on MRI observations, there are inflammatory and degenerative components to the pathogenesis.
 
What is the ketogenic diet and how does it pertain the brain
The ketogenic diet was initially found to be effective in treatment of medically refractory seizures. But the underlying concept might be applied to other diseases as well.
Instead glucose as the energy substrate, ketones are utilized, If the supply of glucose is reduced, the energy source is shifted towards the beta-oxidation of fatty acids into ketone bodies. These ketones become the new source of energy and allows increased ATP formation which is the source of energy in the mitochondria, which is the powerhouse of the cell where energy is formed.
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Different lines of thinking regarding pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis
There are lines of thought that Multiple sclerosis can be inflammatory versus neurodegenerative. Because of this many agents are directed towards the autoimmune component of the disease process. It is commonly thought that the autoimmune process results in the neurodegeneration seen on MRI.
As evidenced by the “black holes” seen on MRI after acute attacks, there is evidence there is a neurodegenerative aspect. This other line of thinking suggests that it is a degenerative process that triggers the inflammatory response.
It’s been found  that degenerating axons have abnormal mitochondria.
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Ketogenic diet and inflammation
In one animal study, it was found that the ketogenic diet reduced inflammatory cytokines after 14 days in animals (2).
 
Ketogenic diet and increased ATP
In one animal model with a control group and a group on ketogenic diet, after 3 weeks it was found that those on the ketogenic diet had a higher ATP/ADP ratio which is speculated to contribute towards neuronal stability.

How can the ketogenic diet help with Multiple Sclerosis?
The ketogenic diet reduces the formation of reactive oxygen species. It preserves ATP production when the mitochondria fails. The thought is that the axons start to degenerate once the mitochondria are dysfunctional (1).
In summary
There are no human clinical studies on ketogenic diet and the improvement of multiple sclerosis. Based on pre-clinical studies, there is indication that ketogenic diet may help improve the ATP stores when the mitochondria becomes dysfunctional which may potentially slow neurodegeneration of axons.
The ketogenic diet might reduce inflammation which is thought to be triggered by a neurodegenerative process in Multiple Sclerosis. However, more studies are needed especially human clinical trials. Currently there is not enough evidence to support this based on the available studies as pre-clinical studies do not always correlate in human trials. More studies are needed.

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Reference
  1. Storoni, M., Plant, G. The therapeutic potential of the ketogenic diet in treating progressive multiple sclerosis. Mult. Scler. Int. 2015. doi 10.1155/2015/681289
  2. Dupuis, N., Curatolo, N., Benoist, J.F., Auvin, S., Ketogenic diet exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. Epilepsia, 2015. 56(7):e95-98
  3. DeVivo, D.C., Leckie, M.P., Ferrendell, J.S., McDougal, D.B., Jr. Chronic ketosis and cerebral metabolism. Ann Neurol. 1978, Apr. 394):331-337
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