Tic

Cannabinoids: pathways and role in the management of motor tics

Virginia Thornley, M.D., Neurologist, Epileptologist

July 16, 2018

@VThornleyMD

https://neurologybuzz.com/

Introduction

As medical marijuana emerges from the caves of obscurity in treating illnesses, physicians are at the forefront of rediscovering ailments that can be treated by medical cannabis. While most traditional scientists and trained clinicians do not think highly of anecdotal research, patients in clinical practice are the best parameters in judging whether a medication is working or not. Oftentimes, even with the best research, clinical practice conveys side effects that were never found during the short period of time of the study. Additionally, as hundreds of thousands of patients start using a new product it is only then one can observe the true efficacy and safety profile which accounts for why research does not always correlate with clinical practice.

Sometimes, one comes across a medication where certain other symptoms may be alleviated not listed on the indications. As a growing number of patients are  recommended medical cannabis, they are presenting with a variety of symptoms that are incidentally relieved.

Background of endacannabinoids and relationship to areas in the brain subserving movement

One of the areas where the brain is rich in endocannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 receptors are in the basal ganglia which subserves the function of movement modulation. There likely exists a role of endogenous cannabinoids in the regulation of movement given its abundance in this area. The CB1 receptors are found in the striatum and caudate nucleus which are rich in GABA-ergic neurons, and pre-terminals of the internal and external globus pallidus, and substantia nigra. They are found in the glutamatergic pathways within the cortical systems and in the subthalamic nucleus (1).

The endocannabinoid system appears to inhibit glutamatergic pathways and increases GABAergic activity in the basal ganglia. It affects the dopaminergic pathway (2). It is speculated that the endocannabinoids may play a role in modulating the various neurotransmitter systems. While large clinical randomized controlled clinical trials may be lacking there is evidence that cannabinoids may reduce the clinical manifestations of motor tics (2).

Review of case studies and case series

There is a paucity of clinical trials studying the role of cannabis in movement disorders. Most of the data is from pre-clinical studies or case reports. Clinical research undoubtedly has been stunted given the scheduling of the agent under a schedule I category and other related factors.

In a small study of 12 patients, tetrahydrocannabinol was studied to determine effectiveness in treatment of tics(3). The Tourette Syndrome Symptom List (TSSL) was utilized for self-evaluations by patients. The examiners used the Yale Global Tic Severity List, Shapiro Tourette Syndrome Severity Scale for rating the severity of tics. A randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out. Those in the group where delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol showed improvement compared to the placebo control group. There was great improvement using the TSSL with a p=0.15. Significant improvement found with complex motor tics using examiner ratings. Simple and vocal tics showed improvement (3).

In a case series of 19 patients, there were 60% who had much less motor tics after treatment with cannabinoids. There were 18 patients who felt they significantly improved (4).

In summary

The fact that the endocannabinoid system on which cannabinoids work is widely found within the basal ganglia which modulates fine movement correlates the function it has with modulation of movement.

While the scarcity of clinical trials is evident, cannabinoids continue to be used in clinical practice with some modicum of success for treatment of motor tics.

https://neurologybuzz.com/

Introduction/Disclaimer

About

References

  1. Koppel, B. Cannabis in the treatment of dystonia, dyskinesias, and tics. Neurotherapeutics. 2015, Oct. 12(4):788-792
  2. Muller-Vahl, K.R., Kolbe, H., Schneider, U., Emrich, H.M. Cannabis in movement disorders. Forsch Komplementarmed. 1999. Oct. 6 Suppl 3:23-27.
  3. Muller-Vahl, K.R., Schneider, U., Koblenz, A., Jobges, M., Kolbe, H., Daldrup, T., Emrich, H.M. Treatment of Touterret’s syndrome with delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) a randomized crossover trial. Pharmacopsychiatry. 2002, Mar. 35(2):57-61
  4. Abi-Jaoude, E., Chen, L., Cheung, P., Bhirkram, T., Sandor, P. J. Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2017 29(4):391-400
Standard
Alzheimer's disease

Cannabinoids: pre-clinical studies on anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in Alzheimer’s disease

 

Virginia Thornley, M.D., Neurologist, Epileptologist

@VThornleyMD

https://neurologybuzz.com/

June 25, 2018

Introduction

Alzheimer’s disease is not a natural progression of senescence. It is a neurological disorder involving deposition of beta amyloid peptides in senile plaques and accumulation of amyloid precursor proteins within the cerebrum particularly in areas affecting memory and cognition. Current pharmaceutic agents at best can only slow the progression of this disorder. There is no cure. Because it not a devastating illness in that it does not decrease the longevity per se, nonetheless, it is devastating to the patient and family members around him or her.

With the advent of cannabinoids into the pharmaceutic fold, attention is turning towards medical value outside its well-known repertory including anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties. Can cannabinoids slow the inflammatory process that is involved in this neurodegenerative condition? This seeks to explore mechanisms by which cannabinoids may play a role in ameliorating the clinical effects seen in Alzheimer’s disease.

Endocannabinoid system

As an overview, the endocannabinoids system is found naturally within the body consisting of endocannabinoids, enzymes and receptors. There are 2 receptors the CB1 receptor which is concentrated in the nervous system and found to a lesser extent in other organ systems and the CB2 receptor which is found mostly in the immune system and in other systems.  Anandamide is an endocannabinoid that exerts its actions on the CB1 receptor, while di-arachidonoylglycerol has a low affinity for the CB1 receptor and interacts with the TPRV or transient receptor potential channels of the vanilloid subtype and the G-coupled receptor family.

Within the cannabis sativa plant are 2 most well-studied phytocannabinoids, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). The CB1 receptor is where delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a mimetic of Anandamide, interacts and can cause psychoactive effects. Cannabidiol is a mimetic of di-arachidonoylglyerol with a lower affinity to the CB1 receptor where 100 times the amount of CBD is required to achieve the same psychoactivity as THC. When CBD and THC are combined there are less side effects since the CBD acts as a non-competitive allosteric modulator at the  CB1 receptor. When the 2 are combined there is an effect that is increased together compared to when each cannabinoid is taken alone, where the effect is significantly much different. The presence of CBD offsets side effects of THC. Common side effects include agitation, hyperactivity and paranoia.

CAA11F12-A957-4FAF-B74D-6C7D2CE6E613

Mechanisms

Senile plaques are found to express CB1 and CB2 receptors within the brain in addition to microglial activation markers. The neurons are rich in CB1 receptors but seem to be greatly reduced in microglial activated areas. CB1 receptor expression and G-related coupled protein are reduced in brains with Alzheimer’s disease. Nitration of proteins are enhanced especially in CB1 and CB2 proteins in Alzheimer’s diseased brains. Adding synthetic cannabinoid WIN55-212-2 to rats caused an inhibition of microglial activation and neuron marker loss. Cannabinoids were found to ameliorate neurotoxicity caused by microglial activation (1).

Another study demonstrates the role of cannabinoids on inflammation in the mouse model using synthetic cannabinoids JWH-133 and WIN55.212-2. Cognition and inflammation were studied. FDG uptake on PET scan  was used to assess areas of metabolic uptake. The amyloid precursor protein mice showed poor object recognition. After administration of the JWH compound, cognitive impairments were reversed. There was reduced FDG uptake in the hippocampal areas. No changes were seen using WIN55.212-2. Beta amyloid proteins were significantly reduced in the mice models when cannabinoids were applied. Microglia was elevated in the APP mice which was reduced after cannabinoid administration (2).

In another mouse study, CB2 receptors were at a low level found in the neurons of unmanipulated mice whereas there was a noted increase in the CB2 receptors in mice that underwent chronic inflammation in the microglia surrounding plaques. This suggests that there is an upregulation of CB2 receptors in the presence of pathological inflammation. This may be a potential target in therapeutic agents in the future (3).

In summary

These pre-clinical studies demonstrate a neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory role of cannabinoids on Alzheimer’s disease. The CB2 appears to be upregulated around activated microglial cells around plaques implying a possible therapeutic target for future treatments. While pre-clinical studies are not human trials, elucidating these mechanisms may play a role in the future therapeutic benefits of cannabinoids on Alzheimer’s disease.

https://neurologybuzz.com/
Introduction/Disclaimer

About

 

References

  1. Ramirez, B.G., Blazquez, C., del Pulgar, T.G., Guzman, M., de Ceballos, M.L. Prevention of Alzheimer’s disease pathologyby cannabinoids: neuroprotection mediated by blockade of microglial activation. J. Neurosci. 2005, 25:1904-13
  2. Martín-Moreno, A.M., Brera, B., Spuch, C., Carro, E., García-García, L., Delgado, M., Pozo, M.A., Innamorato, N.G.,  Cuadrado, A., de Ceballos, M.L. Prolonged oral cannabinoid administration prevents neuroinflammation, lowers b-amyloid levels and improves cognitive performance in Tg APP 2576 mice. J. Neuroinflam. 2012, 9:8
  3. Lopez, A., Aparicio, N., Pazos, M.R., Grande, M.T., Barredo-Manso, M.A., Benito-Cuesta, I., Vazquez, C., Amores, M., Ruiz-Perez, G., Garcia-Garcia, E., Beatka, M., Tolon, R.M., Dittel, B.N., Hillard, C.J., Romero, J. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors in the mouse brain: relevance for Alzheimer’s disease. J. Neuroinflam. 2018, May, 15:158
Standard
Cancer research and cannabinoids

Cannabinoids: a review on pre-clinical studies on anti-angiogenesis, apoptosis and reduction of MMP-2 expression inhibiting cancer cell growth

Virginia Thornley, M.D., Neurologist, Epileptologist

June 24, 2018

@VThornleyMD

https://neurologybuzz.com/

Introduction

The surge of recognition of the medical significance of the cannabis sativa can no longer be ignored. Frustrated with the futility of current pharmaceutic agents, their associated side effects and costs, there is a growing tendency for more natriceutic measures of therapy. Shunned by physicians and by the public, there is a growing clamoring of medical marijuana advocates for its use. There is only a small proportion of physicians qualified to recommend this agent. Prescribing is federally illegal as it is still classified as category I drug. In the state of Florida alone, as of June 2018, out of 75,000 licensed physicians, only 2100 are qualified to recommend it or 2%. Long known for the stigma of its recreational value, its foothold in the medical community is slow-going. Most of the public associates the plant with unseemly, clandestine purposes. The federal law against it stands steadfast, with legislation moving at a molasses pace, even while recognized by state laws. These variables account for the great difficulty procuring this agent which is not only organic and all natural but medical in nature.

However, there is great interest in this plant. The pre-clinical data shows promise but more larger clinical trials are still needed. It seems to be far reaching in its effects and because it is still not well-studied, the vast number of purposes is still largely unknown.

Interest turns towards any anti-neoplastic application it might have. Pre-clinical data has shown some promise, although it may not always translate into human results. The scientific data points towards some benefits in the neoplastic process.

F51D8562-3F50-47FA-8595-1CE460AA6DD9

Endocannabinoid system

In an overview of the endocannabinoid system, there are 2 cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. The CB1 receptor is abundant in the nervous system and found to a lesser extent in other systems. It is through this receptor that psychoactive properties are activated. The CB2 receptor is found largely in the immune system. Anandamide interacts with the CB1 receptor, of which delta-9-tetrahydrocannabnol is a pharmacomimetic. While 2-AG or di-arachidonoylglycerol is a low affinity agonist at the CB1 receptor. Cannabidiol (CBD)is a mimetic of 2-AG, where 100 times the amount of CBD is needed to get the same effect as THC. It has a full ligand effect on the CB2 receptor. The CB1 receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor. Cannabidiol interacts with the TPRV transient receptor potential channel and the GPR or G-protein receptor family. Expression of the cannabinoid receptors are most notable in areas engaged with memory, motor, learning, emotions and endocrine functions.

Endocannabinoids and the role in cancer

The beneficial effects of cannabinoids on symptoms pertaining to neoplasms such as anorexia, nausea and pain are well-known. Investigations turn towards any effect on the actual neoplastic process.

An upregulation of CB receptors are found in high volume in cancerous processes. The enzymes involved are also at high levels. This suggests that the endocannabinoid system may play a role in the neoplastic process. The frequency of the receptors and amount of enzymes may correlate with the aggressiveness of the type of cancer. This suggests that the endocannabinoid system may be revved up and play a role in promoting a pro-tumor environment.

Conversely, there are studies suggesting that activation of the cannabinoid system may be anti-tumorigenic. Reduction of tumor growth was observed with a  reduction in the endocannabinoid degrading enzymes(1).

While there are some inconsistencies, overall, the anti-tumorigenic effects appear to be better demonstrated in pre-clinical studies.

Effect on tumor cells

Overall, there are more studies that cannabinoids including phytocannabinoids such as tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol and synthetic cannabinoids such as JWH-017 show anti-tumorigenic effects.

In one study, the CB1 receptors were found to inhibit the anti-metastatic nature of the K562 cell line which acts as a chronic myelogenous leukemia model in the study (2).

In glioblastoma multiforme tumors, CB1 and CB2 receptors are both expressed. Altered expressions of the receptors were thought to correlate with the manifestation of gliomas and glioblastoma multiforme. Cannabinoids are thought to manifest anti-proliferative activity against tumor cells by 2 mechanisms: anti-neogenesis of vasculature and promotion of apoptosis (3). In one study of glioma stem cell-like cells from glioma cell lines and glioblastoma multiforme biopsies, there was demonstration of the presence of CB1 and CB2 receptors. CB receptor activation changed the gene expression that controlled the stem cell multiplication and differentiation. in addition, cannabinoids were found to reduce cells with the biomarker nestin which is a neuroepithelial cell progenitor. Cannabinoid treated stem like cells resulted in more differentiation and reduced expression of nestin which promotes glioma formation (3).

42717C61-E774-4D0C-A2EF-214A058AD1F5

Cannabinoids were found to reduce angiogenesis by inhibiting the migration of vascular endothelial cells and by stopping the expression of MMP and proangiogenic factor in neoplastic cells (4). By preventing the increased vasculature cell migration, tumor growth is suppressed. With cannabinoids selectively acting on tumor cells, apoptosis is rendered resulting further in the blocking the growth of cancer cells resulting in the reduction in the proliferation of cancer cells (4). This study is significant because cannabinoids might be developed to achieve effect on reducing proliferation of tumor cells.

In a significant mouse model study, cannabinoids were found to reduce the activity of metalloproteinase matrix in glioma like cells. C6.9 and C6.4 glioma cell lines were used which are cannabinoid models showing cannabinoid responsive and resistant responses. Biopsy samples of 2 patients with multiforme glioblastoma were used. The cells were treated with tetrahydrocannabinol, JWH-133 a synthetic cannabinoid with CB2 receptor agonist effects and fumonisin.  MMP was measured. The C6.9 cell line was found to have less tumor cell growth and less MMP-2 expression found on western blot using SDS-PAGE when treated with cannabinoids. It selectively reduced MMP-2, other MMP’s remained the same level. In C6.4 cell lines, tumor growth and level of MMP-2 were not affected. The study demonstrates that cannabinoids inhibit tumor cell growth and lowers MMP-2. MMP-2 is expressed in many different cancer lines especially aggressive activity. While the tumor generation is more complex than this, the study adds significant information about tumor genesis and a role of cannabinoids in suppressing cancer growth (5).

In summary

Cannabinoids can affect the aggressiveness of tumors by inhibiting the vascular neogenesis. In addition in the animal model for gliomas, it is demonstrated to suppress cancer cell growth and the expression of MMP-2 which is associated with many neoplastic cell lines. More studies are needed as the neoplastic process is complex. In addition, pre-clinical studies need to be translated into human studies. Every mechanism elucidated helps towards understand the complex pathophysiology of cancer and potential therapeutic targets.

References

1.Śledziński, P., Zeyland, J., Słomski, R., Nowak., A.  The current state and future perspectives of cannabinoids in cancer biology. Cancer Biology. 2018; 7(30):765-775

2, Gholizadeh, F., Gharehmani, M.H., Aliebrahimi, S., Shadboorestan, A., Ostad, S.N.  Assessment of cannabinoids agonist and antagonist in invasion potential of K562 cancer cells. Iran Biomed. 2018  (epub ahead of print)

3. McAllister SD, Soroceanu L, Desprez P-Y. The antitumor activity of plant-derived non-psychoactive cannabinoids. Journal of neuroimmune pharmacology : the official journal of the Society on NeuroImmune Pharmacology. 2015;10(2):255-267. doi:10.1007/s11481-015-9608-y.

4. Blazquez, C., Casanova, M.L., Planas, A., del Pulgar, T.G., Villanueva, C., Fernandez-Acenero, M.J., Aragones, J., Huffman, J.W., Jorcano, J.L., Guzman, M. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by cannabinoids. FASEB J. 2003, Jan., 17(3):529-531

5. Blazquez, C., Salazar, M., Carracedo, A., Lorente, M., Egia, A., Gonzalez-Feria, L., Haro, A., Velasco, G., Guzman, M. Cannabinoids inihibit glioma cell invasion by down regulating matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression. Neuropharmacology. 2008, Jan. 54(1):235-243

Standard
fibromyalgia

Medical marijuana in fibromyalgia: molecular mechanisms and small randomized controlled trials

Virginia Thornley, M.D., Neurologist, Epileptologist

@VThornleyMD

June 17, 2018

Introduction

Fibromyalgia used to be  a condition denoting excessive pain and was previously questionable as there was no testing that could prove or disprove it. Now, the current thought is that it is attributed to hypersensitivity of the nervous system to pain impulses resulting in multiple points of pain in the body.

Endocannabinoid system in pain modulation

The endocannabinoid system is a major chemical neurotransmitter system that has only come to light as to physiology in the last 20 years. The CB1 receptor is found predominantly in the nervous system on which the endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide exerts its effects. The CB2 receptor is found mostly in the immune system on which 2-Arachidonoylglycerol acts. In the nervous system, cannabinoid receptors are seen in the periaqueductal gray area, ventromedial medulla and dorsal horn of the spinal cord which are areas where pain transmission takes place. This suggests that endocannabinoids play a major role in modulation of pain and can impact pain control through manipulation of this system.

Anandamide and and 2-Arachidonoylglycerol are synthesized on demand. It is released immediately after production. 2-AG is formed from a 2 step process. Anandamide has a low affinity to the TPRV1 receptor (2).

1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) is  a precursor or 2-AG which is formed by hydrolysis of membrane phosphoinositides. DAG is hydrolyzed by 2-AG hydrolase to form 2-AG. 2-AG may be stimulated by activation of G protein receptor such as glutamate receptors. It activates both CB1 and CB2 receptors. Cannabidiol which is found in the cannabis sativa plant is a natural mimetic of 2-AG. Endogenous 2-AG is found 170 times more than Anandamide in the brain. Exogenous 2-AG suppresses nociceptive stimulus (2). 2-AG activity is potentiated with natural 2-acylglycerols which enhances the effects which does not happen when used alone. This is an entourage effect found in the brain where the combination of substances give a combined resulting effect which does not occur if used alone (2).

Mechanisms in pain modulation

Cannabinoids were found to reduce nociceptive transmission at the level of the pain c-fiber responses in the spinal dorsal horn.

B1F55FBA-970D-4B7D-B96C-BFF117A17DC0

Randomized controlled trial in fibromyalgia

In one study of 40 patients in a randomized controlled clinical trial, nabilone which is a synthetic cannabinoid was given over a 4 week period. Measures that were evaluated included the visual analog scale for primary outcome and for secondary outcome measure, tender points, secondary outcome measure, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) at weeks 2 and 4 were used. There was statistical difference in treated vs. control groups for pain (P value< 0.02), anxiety (P<0.02 and FIQ (P<0.02). There were more side effects for the treated cohort compared tot he placebo controlled group. This study demonstrates that cannabinoids may be an effective treatment for fibromyalgia (1).

In one paper that reviewed 18 randomized controlled clinical trials of cannabinoids in chronic pain syndromes including fibromyalgia, cannabinoids were found to be an effective type of treatment. Despite the short duration of the trials, pain relief was effective and mild to moderate adverse effects were noted. Larger clinical trials are needed (2).

About

Introduction/Disclaimer

https://neurologybuzz.com/

  1. Skrabek, et al, “Nabilone for the treatment of pain in fibromyalgia,” J. Pain, 2008, Feb., (9)2:164:173
  2. Lynch, et al, “Cannabinoids for treatment of chronic non-cancer pain: a systemic review of randomized trials,” Br. J. Pharmacology, 2011, Nov., 72(5):735-744
Standard
stem cell

Mesenchymal stem cell therapy: a viable non-surgical option in lower back pain treatment

Virginia Thornley, M.D., Neurologist, Epileptologist

June 9, 2018

Introduction

Back pain is one of the most common pain disorders encountered by neurologists, neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons and pain specialists in the out-patient setting. It is not uncommon for patients to go through an extensive list of medications, steroid injections, physical therapy and even surgery and still remain in unrelenting pain. There is a growing interest in alternative treatments especially with the opioid crisis looming and restriction of strong pain medications. This seeks to review scientific mechanisms behind the success in stem cell treatment. It recaps clinical data. Despite a scarcity of published huge randomized clinical trials, there is a growing and clamoring need for alternative treatments such as stem cell therapy for patients desperately trying to find alleviation from their pain. Trailblazing physicians are using this treatment option in real life practice with growing results.
Back pain is a very common disorder which is especially prevalent in the elderly after wear and tear of long-term activity in conjunction with the natural degenerative changes that come with the aging process. Normally the intervertebral disc complex can withstand compression and shear forces because of the proteoglycans that bind water molecules. This becomes lost with aging. In degenerative disc disease, there are pro-inflammatory molecules.

Pathogenesis of degenerative disc disease
Within the nucleus pulposus, there is no vascular supply except at the end neural plate, has no nerves and is prone to damage. The nucleus pulposus relies on glycolysis for effective disposal of waste products through the endplates. After decades, the nucleus pulposus no longer has notochordal features and is replaced by small chondrocyte like cells. There is replacement of the collagen type 1 and collagen type 2 loss eventually replaced with fibrocartilaginous material. Eventually with time, the endplates have calcification of the small pores where molecules diffuse (1).

 

13925137_10154408559523841_4630279556322234980_n

There are anabolic processes involved as well as catabolic processes including involvement of enzymes, inflammatory mediators, proteinases, aggrecanases. Examples include IL-1 and TNF-alpha. because the disc is avascular this creates an environement of poor regenerative responses with harsh conditions (3).

Some patients may have a genetic predisposition to have flawed extracellular matrix where degenerative disc disease may occur more severely than in other people. Cleavage of proteoglycan can occur with enzymes resulting in loss of height and less ability to reduce compressive and shearing forces. In addition, environmental factors including occupational activities, excessive physical activity impacting the spine may contribute towards degenerative disc disease (1).

Alternative treatment: stem cell therapy
In order to address these issues, various treatments have arisen to try to try to halt the cascade leading to degenerative disc disease. This includes implantation of biomolecules to reduce the catabolic process.

 

 

Stem cell research is gaining more traction as a viable alternative for treatment of this debilitating condition. One study looked at the potential of nucleus pulposus-like cells derived from mesenchymal cells in the rabbit model. From these cells, SOX9, ACAN, COL2, FOXF1, and KRT19 genes were expressed(2). Transplanted nucleus pulposus cells were integrated into the intervertebral disc complex. Improved water content, glycosaminoglycan, and cellularity within the complex was noted. There was a suggestion of biosynthesis with the gene expression of SOX9, ACAn, COL4 (2). This animal study demonstrates that there may be value in nucleus pulposus cells derived from mesenchymal cells may lead to clinical studies where stem cells can be used for back pain.

10562503_10152824035868841_6289734604794227060_o

Injection of mesenchymal stem cells
Injections of mesenchymal stems cells into the disc may reduce the clinical pain and restore disc tissue loss. It may be able to reduce the catabolic microenvirnment (3)

Clinical studies of stem cell use in humans
It appears that stems cells of mesenchymal type derived from adipose or the umbilicus may have the most promise (4).

In one small study of 10 patients, autologous bone marrow mesenchymal cells were were injected in the nucleosus pulposus and followed for a year. After 3 months, there was improvement of pain and disability of 85% of the maximum. After 12 months, there was still high water content within the nucleosus pulposus (5).

Stem cell effects were studied in 2 patients with back pain and leg numbness. Marrow fluid was obtained autologously from the ilium from each patient. Mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in autogenous serum. Fenestration was performed and collagen sponge was applied percutaneously to the affected intervertebral disc complex. After 2 years, the T2 signal was high showing increased disc content in the grafted discs. Clinical symptoms were ameliorated (6).

german tripand old pics 410_preview

Clinical trials
In an open label trial of 26 patients, using the VAS and Oswestbry disability scale, there was reduced pain after percutaneous injection of bone marrow cell concentrate showing autologous mesenchymal stem cells are a viable alternative treatment for back pain (7). They studied the patients through 12 months. Those who received >2000 colony forming fibroblast units/ml had faster and greater pain reduction.

There is one small randomized controlled clinical trial in 24 patients using the Pfirrmann grading scale for degeneration, allogeneic mesenchymal cells were transferred to the clinical cohort. Significant relief of pain was noted compared to the sham group demonstrating that allogeneic transfer may be logistically better than autogenous transfer (8).

 

Possible adverse effects
Concerns include transformation into neoplastic process. This seems to be true with embryonic stem cells which are much earlier seen in the cell lineage. Mesenchymal cells are further down the line as a committed cell type to obviate this. With in vitro culturing, there is concern for cell mutations, but this is less of a concern if it is a same day procedure, autologous and exist as when they were in the body previously. There is concern for extravasation beyond the limit of the disc and if combined with other treatments such as PRP it may promote osteogenesis. In addition, animal models may not replicate the harsh microenvironments of disc pathology where continual torsion and pressure is involved and effects and outcomes might be different (3).

In summary
There is much scientific and animal model data that stem cells remain a viable option for treatment of back pain which is one of the most common problem encountered by neurologists, neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons and pain management specialists. While there is much demonstrated in animal studies, clinical trials are still very sparse. This treatment, however, shows promise and despite paucity of clinical trial data, this treatment is gaining traction in practicing clinicians who treat back pain.

Given the failure with medications and even with surgery there is increased interest in alternative treatments including stem cell therapy.

Introduction/Disclaimer

Introduction/Disclaimer

References

1. Rosenberg, et al, “Bedside to bench and back to bedside: translational implications of targeted intervertebral disc therapeutics,” J. Orthop. Translat., 2017, Apr., 10:18-27.
2. Perez-Cruet, et al, “Potential of human nucleus pulposus-like cells derived from umbilical cord to treat degenerative disc disease,” Neurosurgery, 2018, Feb., doi:10.1093/neuros/nyy012
3. Zeckser, et al, “Multipotent stem cell treatment for discogenic low back pain and disc degeneration,” Stem Cell Int., 2016, doi: 10.1155/2016/3908389
4. Knezevic, et al, “Treatment of chronic low back pain – new approaches on the horizon,” J. Pain Res., 2017, May 10, 10:1111-1123
5. Orozco, et al, “Intervertebral dis repair by autologous mesenchymal bone marrow cells: a pilot study,” Transplantation, 2011, Oct., 15, 92 (7):822-8
6. Yoshikawa, et al, “Disc regeneration therapy using marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation: a report of 2 cases,” Spine, 2010, May 15, 35 (11):E475-80
7. Pettiness, et al, “Percutaneous bone cell concentrate reduces discigenic lumbar pain through 12 months,” Stem Cell, 2015, 33(1):146-156
8. Noriega, et al, “Intervertebral disc repair by allogeneic mesenchymal bone marrow cells,” Transplantation, Aug., 2017, 101(8):1945-1951.

 

 

 

 

Standard